Search / Filter
Advanced Options

Why not Build your unique bespoke vehicle here on the Land Rover configurator and simply email direct to us for a completely free quotation based on the vehicle that you have build to your own unique specification.

Build it with the exterior colour choice, see how it looks, then pick your own unique interior combination, why not add some of the factory options that are so popular with others, options like Privacy Glass or bigger Alloy Wheels or just maybe the Apple Car play.

Simply build it on line to what you require, and we will turn your requirement into an official quotation, the choice is yours after that if you wish to proceed and place the order with us.

 Land Rover Discovery Sport

Land Rover Discovery Sport

Land Rover reckons that this Discovery Sport is the most versatile premium compact SUV currently on sale. Jonathan Crouch takes a look at the revised version.

Land Rover's Discovery Sport was a big success in its original form, with almost 100,000 examples sold in the UK alone. But competitors in the SUV 'D'-segment for 7-seat family Crossovers have caught up. Hence the need for this revised model, which now gets a full range of mild hybrid diesel engines and upgraded infotainment. It's still the class of the field if you ever need to go off road. But now it pleases more in many other ways too.

You hesitate to think of where Land Rover might be now without the Discovery Sport. It's one of the key models that's kept JLR going over the last five years and in the current climate, this car needs to pull its weight in the showroom more than ever. Which is a big ask, given that since the original launch in 2014, direct rivals like Volkswagen's Tiguan Allspace, Peugeot's 5008, SEAT's Tarraco and a new more up-market version of Hyundai's Santa Fe have all arrived to deliver an alternative to what the Discovery Sport can offer.

So Land Rover has set out to take the lead once more in this class, primarily with a fresh range of electrified engines. But also with a smarter cabin, extra technology and stronger standards of safety.

Land Rover Range Rover

Land Rover Range Rover

The improved fourth generation Range Rover is more efficient, better connected and smarter inside. Jonathan Crouch looks at what's on offer.

So many cars claim to be unique but the Range Rover really is, continuing to set the standard in the super-luxury SUV sector. This improved MK4 model gets the option of petrol/electric Plug-in hybrid power - and offers mild hybrid diesel power for the first time. And all variants get a luxurious cabin with an intuitive 'Touch Pro Duo' infotainment system. Otherwise, things are much as they've always been with a Range Rover, this aluminium-bodied luxury SUV good enough to properly combine the imperious qualities of a top luxury saloon with off piste abilities that would be limited only by the skills of its driver. A Rolls Royce in the rough, there's nothing quite like it.

'Don't change it: just make it better'. That's what Range Rover customers have long told Land Rover, so consistent evolution of this model has long been the Solihull company's mantra when it comes to this car. With a pedigree over four distinct generations going all the way back to 1970, it's always been, without question, the 'finest 4x4xfar'. We're currently edging towards the end of the lifespan of the fourth generation version, but even at this point in this design's development, some pretty fundamental changes are being introduced - a key one being the introduction of various electrified engines: we'll be discussing those in this review.

This MK4 model adopted a lightweight aluminium body structure to make itself faster and more responsive at the same time as being more efficient and cheaper to run. As ever, this car offers a properly limousine-like rear cabin and performance approaching that of a super-saloon. And yes, if you need it to be, it's well capable of allowing you to set off across the Serengeti or explore the Amazon. It is, more than ever, one of a kind.

Land Rover Range Rover Evoque

Land Rover Range Rover Evoque

Range Rover's Evoque has demolished all sales records for SUVs in this class. Jonathan Crouch reports on how the latest MK2 model aims to stay in the top spot.

How do you right a best seller? That was Land Rover's problem when it came to creating the second generation version of its runaway success story, the Range Rover Evoque, a car that now accounts for a third of the brand's total sales. It's a fashionable, yet capable proposition that has fundamentally changed the premium mid-sized SUV market and rivals now have to contend with an evolved version that features a more efficient range of diesel and petrol engines, including electrified and mild hybrid technology. Plus there's smarter styling, more interior space, extra off road ability and sharper handling thanks to an all-new 'PTA' platform. As a result, if you want an SUV of this kind, this is still the one to beat.

It's getting on for half a century since all-wheel driving was revolutionised by the Range Rover, a car now a class apart in the luxury 4x4 sector. But what would that model look like re-invented in smaller form for very different Millennial times, an age in which fashion and frugality are as important as toughness and traction? Something like this we think, the Range Rover Evoque, here rejuvenated in second generation form.

As before, it sets out to meet a daunting set of challenges, aiming to provide luxurious room for four in a shape shorter than a Ford Focus. Along with handling as satisfying as a sports coupe. And economy that might allow green-minded versions to rival the returns of a citycar. All to be delivered with class-leading off road expertise. In a car right for its times. Quite a build-up. Quite a car? Let's find out.

Land Rover Range Rover Sport

Land Rover Range Rover Sport

This improved version of the second generation Range Rover Sport gets the option of clever mild hybrid diesel engine technology for the first time. And, as before, it offers amazing all-terrain capability. If you can afford one, there's now very little not to like, thinks Jonathan Crouch

The Range Rover Sport came of age in second generation form, bigger, lighter and sharper in its reactions. Now, Land Rover has usefully improved it, adding in MHEV mild hybrid diesel power for the first time in the shape of the freshly added D300 and D350 variants. As you'd expect, this dynamic luxury SUV also gets up-to-the-minute safety and connectivity technology in its latest form, plus there's a 'Low Traction Launch' system for peerless all-terrain capability.

So to the Range Rover Sport. A car that in its original guise was neither a Range Rover or 'sporty'. In fact, it was based almost entirely on the brand's sensible Discovery model and, thanks to that car's practical ladder frame chassis, as about as dynamic to drive. Not so this second generation model, now usefully improved to create the version we're going to look at here. Appropriately, its very existence is properly inspired - and in many ways completely made possible - by the fully-fledged Range Rover. Back in 2012, that car was completely redeveloped in fourth generation form with aluminium underpinnings, sharper handling and hybrid power, engineering eagerly seized upon by the Range Rover Sport development team in their quest to at last be able to offer a credibly sporting SUV rival to cars like the Porsche Cayenne and the BMW X5.

These two competitors of course, don't have to blend in unrivalled off road excellence with their back road blasting. They don't have to be automotive swiss army knives - all things to all people - in quite the same way. So, burdened with such expectations, how can this Range Rover Sport take them on at their own game? That's what we're here to find out.

Land Rover Range Rover Velar

Land Rover Range Rover Velar

The Velar has established itself as a really credible contender in the mid part of the Range Rover model line-up. Jonathan Crouch takes a look at the improved version.

The Velar is arguably the most sporting Range Rover yet made - and very much the Solihull brand's interpretation of what a really premium mid-sized luxury SUV should be. If you're looking at something like an upper-spec Mercedes GLC Coupe or BMW X4 but want a car in this class with a bit more substance - something better, something.. Different, you're exactly the kind of person this Range Rover Velar is aimed at. And in this revised form, it's an even more complete package.

The very first luxury SUV was a Range Rover, a pioneering 4x4 first launched back in 1970. Prior to that car's original introduction, a fleet of 26 pre-production models were used by development engineers and these ran under the 'Velar' name, Land Rover keen to hide the revolutionary vehicle's real identity, the word derived from the Latin 'velaris', meaning to veil or cover.

Almost half a century later in 2017, the Velar name returned to the Range Rover line-up, used to badged the brand's fourth model, a mid-sized contender that aimed to plug the previous gap between the Evoque and the Range Rover Sport. The Solihull brand knows that premium German rivals have set a high standard in this market segment, so spared no effort in building in advanced technology, compelling design and absolute attention to detail. But time moves on - and fortunately, the Velar has moved on with it. With this revised model, let's see just how